God Has a Bigger and Better Story for You

We are a story-telling family, composing on-the-spot homespun tales, filling up the long minutes of road trips with audio books, laughing together over replays from crazy conversations, and delighting in glory-moments together after the fact. As our family continually rotates in wider orbits, stories have become the fibers that connect us, that keep us known to one other.

I’m grateful that all our story threads are woven into the fabric of the huge over-arching narrative found in the pages of Scripture. This once-upon-a-time-that-really-happened got its start in the mind of God, but the plot first hunkered down in the idyllic setting of Eden. Nancy Guthrie picked up her pen, gathered up the tangled threads of that story set in a garden, and she moves forward in hope through the unfolding of God’s redemptive plan in her latest book, Even Better than Eden: Nine Ways the Bible’s Story Changes Everything about Your Story

On her meandering way from the thunderous God-force of creation to the end of the ages, she shares stunning truth about “what the original garden has to show us about the more secure, more satisfying, and more glorious garden we’re destined to live in forever, which will be even better than Eden.” (14) It’s easy to forget that Eden was born out of an uninhabitable wasteland on a planet that was “formless and empty.”

  • Guthrie follows this story of wilderness through the Old Testament and the wanderings of the discontented Israelites, the ruins of Jerusalem after Nebuchadnezzar’s armies had had their way, and into the New Testament where Jesus passed His wilderness testing and Paul lived pinned down by a thorn in the flesh, but found contentment in his spiritual wilderness;
  • Then, there’s the story of the tree, a symbol from Genesis to Revelation that pops up in the appearance of the lampstands in the Tabernacle and in prophetic symbolism. By grace, we are invited to find our way to the tree of life by way of Calvary’s tree;
  • The story of God’s image is full of hope, for though it was marred, it was flawlessly revealed in Christ and will ultimately be restored in us;
  • The story of clothing begins with God providing for Adam and Eve with love and tenderness that points to the truth that one day we will be beautifully clothed in “the greater glory Adam and Eve forfeited” (70);
  • The story of the Bridegroom features Eve as the original bride in the very first wedding conducted by God which went terribly wrong. That pain resonated throughout Israel’s history, but the ruined bride will one day be restored and presented to God’s Son, the second Adam’
  • The story of sabbath began before there was Law and remains as God’s gift;
  • The story of offspring unpacks Psalm 91 within the greater context of God’s sovereignty over evil and the “Offspring of the Woman” (Jesus) who will put an end to evil once and for all;
  • The story of a dwelling place assures believers of God’s intention to make His home with us–an intention that cannot be thwarted even by our own fumbling and fluctuating intention to cling to Him. The tabernacle, the temple, and God’s indwelling Spirit all bear witness to His zeal and devotion;
  • Finally, the story of the city reveals that all of Scripture points toward the story of two cities– “the city of man and the city of God. And what matters most about your story is which city you have made your home.”

Nancy Guthrie renders biblical theology with beauty and a depth of emotion that motivates me to become a better learner, and a more passionate student of Scripture and observer of life. A firm grasp on the gospel-oriented-big-picture of the Bible’s 66 books will change the way you read. God takes a long view of goodness and hope, and his promises for our welfare point to a life that exponentially transcends the three-score-and-ten we fixate upon.

A good foundation in biblical theology also impacts on the way we pray.  For example, God’s promise of protection in Psalm 91 is not the lucky-rabbit’s foot that means our children will “never face danger or death in this life. But [rather that God] has promised to gather his own to himself, where he will protect them from ultimate and eternal harm.”

Following the threads of these nine stories reinforced my understanding of God as both transcendent and relational. Finding myself within the context of His desires for me — a hope that far exceeds my own aspirations for myself and those I love — opens my eyes to the beauty of struggle and the redemptive nature of waiting as we fix our eyes upon the unseen, and trust God for a future home that will be truly (and amazingly!) even better than Eden.


Many thanks to Crossway for providing a copy of this book to facilitate my review, which, of course, is offered freely and with honesty.

Grace and peace to you,

I  am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. If you should decide to purchase Even Better than Eden: Nine Ways the Bible’s Story Changes Everything about Your Storysimply click on the title (or the image) within the text, and you’ll be taken directly to Amazon. If you decide to buy, I’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you.

If you enjoy reading Living Our Days, subscribe to get regular content delivered to your inbox. Just enter your e-mail address in the field at the top of this page.

I link-up with a number of blogging communities on a regular basis. They are listed in the left sidebar by day of the week. I hope that you will take a moment to enjoy reading the work of some of these fine writers and thinkers.

Advertisements

God Has an Ever-Unfolding Vision for You

The knock at the door came as no surprise. Rahab was used to furtive visitors at all hours as male customers came to her door, and yet this pair was different, for they were part of Israel’s advance surveillance strategy, the first wave in their mission to conquer Jericho for the glory of God. It was Rahab’s quick thinking that saved the spies, rescued her own family, and earned her a paragraph in the Hebrews 11 honor roll of faith.

God’s vision for Rahab was larger than anything she had ever dreamed, and it was this dramatic turn-around that inspired Becky Moreland to name RAHAB ministries in 2002, when her vision for impacting lives on the streets of Akron, Ohio was just getting off the ground. Reaching Above Hopelessness and Brokenness, RAHAB’s outreach ministries serve women and children who are trapped in lives of addiction, prostitution, abuse, and fear. Team members do their work directly on the the streets of Akron, exposing the darkness of the sex trafficking industry, praying on the spot with the needy, and cooperating with law enforcement officials to protect women who live in continual danger. Their safe house provides a refuge to women with nowhere else to go, and their plans for a juvenile safe house will be an invitation to home for girls ages 11 to 17.

God’s Ever-Unfolding Vision

Bring Me a Vision: A Story of Redeeming Hope is the true unfolding of Becky Moreland’s story. Founder of RAHAB, she lived her own miracle of turn-around and her co-author Pam Ecrement bore witness to it, first as her counselor and then, later, as her friend and colleague in ministry. When Becky first approached Pam for counseling, she was seeking help for her children, but Pam soon learned that Becky’s own traumatic childhood was impacting her mothering in ways that were detrimental, in spite of her best intentions.

Becky learned early on that the world was a dangerous place, and it was risky to trust even the adults who were supposedly in her life to protect and care for her. A victim of serial abuse, Becky learned to close off her early memories, setting the stage for poor relational choices and a downward spiral into alcoholism and immorality.  Pam Ecrement brings a counselor’s voice to her description of Becky’s life, lending a helpful sub-narrative that spills over to educate the reader on the complexities of tangled generational webs of sin and sadness. The glory of God is put on display as His story runs its course in the life of an ordinary woman who has been impacted by the love of an extraordinary God.

RAHAB continues to provide rescue and resources for victims of trafficking, and you can learn more at their website. Furthermore, all proceeds from the sale of Bring Me a Vision will go directly to fund RAHAB’s continued outreach. The book is available only through the Resources page of Pam’s website, A New Lens, and you can click here to order your copy.

Let the unfolding of Becky’s story encourage you that God has a vision for you as well, for these are His Words to His beloved:

Thus says the Lord,
    who makes a way in the sea,
    a path in the mighty waters. . . 

 “Remember not the former things,
    nor consider the things of old.
 Behold, I am doing a new thing;
    now it springs forth, do you not perceive it?
I will make a way in the wilderness
    and rivers in the desert.”  (Isaiah 43:16, 18-19)

Because God’s Vision for You Is Also Amazing,

Many thanks to the author for providing a copy of this book to facilitate my review, which, of course, is offered freely and with honesty.

If you enjoy reading Living Our Days, subscribe to get regular content delivered to your inbox. Just enter your e-mail address in the field at the top of this page.

I link-up with a number of blogging communities on a regular basis. They are listed in the left sidebar by day of the week. I hope that you will take a moment to enjoy reading the work of some of these fine writers and thinkers.

Run Toward the Darkness with Borrowed Light

In times of danger and disaster throughout history, true believers have made their mark by running toward the darkness. Whether it was a plague in second century Rome or a twenty-first century hurricane in America’s deep south, if we follow Mr. Rogers’s advice and “look for the helpers,” we might be surprised by how many of them are Christians who have chosen to be part of this particular dark setting in order to put the Light of the World on display.

As Christians, we have no light of our own, but the nature of our Borrowed Light is so compelling that others are drawn to its warmth and luminosity, just as we are drawn to the borrowed light of the moon against an inky sky.  In her poetry collection (The Consequence of Moonlight: Poems), Sofia Starnes has expressed this exact quality of sainthood, the here-ness or there-ness of a life that “orbits the earth but [is] not of the earth.

It is the discipline of recalling the source of our Light that keeps the underlying Presence in proper view. G.K. Chesterton borrows the same reality for his own timeless metaphor, for “just as the sun and the moon look the same size” at first glance, a right understanding of the universe soon reveals that “the sun is immeasurably our master, and the small moon only our satellite.” (229)

An accomplished poetess, Starnes employs delightful wordplay to embody the intangible to convey the loveliness of her observations:

“I wonder how such puny a word as pit,
could be both seed and slum, both dormant agency
and tomb; both conflict verb–met up against–

and scoop; a stone that yields, yields small,
yet hurts the hand. I wonder how,
but pittances deceive; thus is the way of potency

and plea; the oil is notched by hooves
and by the Fall, and then by falling fledglings,
insecure.

How measured is the earth for gift and scar,
for creaks and croons, for the precarious child.”  (69)

Borrowed Light for Living

One of my favorite elements of poetic writing is the surprising Scriptural connections that arise. Writing of Israel’s waste and desolate places, the prophet Isaiah imagines the complaint of future generations:  “The place is too cramped for me, make room for me to live.” (Isaiah 49:20 ESV) The poem “Catacombs” (64) adds to the imagery with comparison to an 80-year-old woman’s real-life six-day confinement in earthquake rubble, prompting the reader to examine her own surroundings. From what cramped places may I also emerge unscathed and with a great story to share?

Let us continue to trust in the borrowed Light that dwells in power, living our way into richly share-able tales by holy risk and trusting in the the “Lord of spill and swell” (118). May we also, in our own day, run toward the darkness with a glorious excess–“not merely patched: pampered, festooned, unspent,” but instead (YES, Lord!) trusting in the future of “a risen body our flesh has never dreamt.” (118)

Many thanks to Paraclete Press for providing a copy of this book to facilitate my review, which, of course, is offered freely and with honesty.

I  am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. If you should decide to purchase The Consequence of Moonlight: Poems simply click on the title (or the image) within the text, and you’ll be taken directly to Amazon. If you decide to buy, I’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Rejoicing in the Brilliance of Our Borrowed Light,

Image Credit:  Calvin R. Morin (on the bridge to Rackliffe Island) 

If you enjoy reading Living Our Days, subscribe to get regular content delivered to your inbox. Just enter your e-mail address in the field at the top of this page.

I link-up with a number of blogging communities on a regular basis. They are listed in the left sidebar by day of the week. I hope that you will take a moment to enjoy reading the work of some of these fine writers and thinkers.

 

Is There a “Right Way” to Do Church Ministry?

Conversations about missionaries and missions strategy are commonplace in our home. We talk about the latest newsletter updates, who’s “home,” and who’s “back on the field.” We wonder about the members of our missionary family when we don’t hear from them, and we puzzle over big picture concerns in an era in which more missionaries are retiring than can possibly be replaced by new recruits.

In Mapping Church Missions: A Compass for Ministry Strategy, Sharon Hoover introduces a way of thinking about the genuine challenges of initiating and maintaining a program of global outreach that is in keeping with a biblical view of The Great Commission, while also taking into consideration the uniqueness of each body of believers. Her good work and varied experiences have helped her to produce a road map for intentional missions strategy that transcends personal interests and agendas.

Rarely are our burning questions about church practices able to be corralled with a pat answer. My husband chairs the missions committee in our church, and his life would be so much easier if shimmering golden percentages were handed down from heaven to guide missions policy: What is the ideal percentage of the budget to allocate to foreign missions and how much for local ministries? Approval of short-term projects would be a cinch if everyone could just agree that their purpose is outreach and impact on the field.  Or is it mainly for the development and growth of the participants . . .?

7 Continuums to Sort the Issues

Since pat answers are unavailable (and mostly unhelpful), Hoover has identified seven topics, seven conversations that need to happen and each one represents a continuum:

  1.  Is the church called to perform good works OR to to engage in activities that present the gospel?
  2. Is our highest priority to meet the needs we can see all around us OR should our focus be centered on the regions beyond, those who have never even heard of Jesus?
  3. Are we to direct our resources mainly toward emergency crisis relief OR will people best be served by long-term engagement once the crisis has passed?
  4. Which is most necessary:  Tangible investments such as money, clothing, and vehicles? OR will an investment of time and talent be more valuable in the long run?
  5. Can short-term ministry teams work effectively on the field OR is this nothing more than Christian tourism?
  6. Is the focus of ministry a matter of serving those who are sent to minister OR those who will receive that ministry?
  7. How much risk is acceptable in planning a ministry? Is safety an obstacle to fulfilling the Great Commission OR should “common sense” prevail?

These seven questions are a wise starting point for conversations that assist local church leaders in  discovering and then maintaining their location on these key bandwidths for missional engagement. Sharon Hoover asserts that “we need to check our compass bearing frequently to confirm that our direction remains true to our initial calling. As time passes and we become familiar with the terrain, we are tempted to set the compass aside. But when we do this our kingdom-focused navigation gets off track.”

“If You Want to Go Fast, Go Alone. If You Want to Go Far, Go Together.”

Driving south on I-95, my Kindle illuminated the front seat of our car as my husband and I made an impulsive trip to L.L. Bean one August evening. I had brought Mapping Church Missions: A Compass for Ministry Strategy along for the hour’s ride because I wanted to get his input, but soon found myself reading great chunks aloud. The questions stimulated conversation and the well-conceived scenarios at each chapter’s end acted as both mirror and light.

Sharon Hoover has developed a resource that is thought provoking and will challenge any individual who is excited about the call to build God’s kingdom. However, she has also constructed a compass, a tool for groups who need to have monumental conversations that will help them get their bearings, clarify their thinking, and ensure that they are traveling in line with both the truth of Scripture and the passions and callings of those who are on the road together.

Many thanks to Intervarsity Press for providing a copy of this book to facilitate my review, which, of course, is offered freely and with honesty.

I  am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. If you should decide to purchase Mapping Church Missions: A Compass for Ministry Strategy, simply click on the title (or the image) within the text, and you’ll be taken directly to Amazon. If you decide to buy, I’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you.

If you enjoy reading Living Our Days, subscribe to get regular content delivered to your inbox. Just enter your e-mail address in the field at the top of this page.

I link-up with a number of blogging communities on a regular basis. They are listed in the left sidebar by day of the week. I hope that you will take a moment to enjoy reading the work of some of these fine writers and thinkers.

Imagining the possibilities,

Pastoral Ministry: The Courageous Calling to a Faithful Love

Ministry professionals rarely lead with their weaknesses. We want church leaders with plenty of personality, charisma, and confidence. Missionary letters and reports may dip into Brené Brown vulnerability territory for a paragraph or two, but the overall theme is generally a litany of accomplishments and success stories. The 21st century church largely agrees that blessing and success are the measure of a person’s calling. Of course, we have a pretty way of defining “blessing,” and an even prettier way of judging anyone whose life does not exude the evidences of “blessing.” This is human nature, but it is ironic given the pattern established by apostles who commended one another to “share in suffering as a good solider of Christ Jesus.” (II Timothy 2:3) Church history trumpets the stories of saints who chose death over defection or endured unfathomable hardship in carrying out their calling.

Editors Collin Hansen and Jeff Robinson have selected the stories of 12 Faithful Men: Portraits of Courageous Endurance in Pastoral Ministry in an effort to dismantle the cool factor that prevails in our view of ministry life. Beginning with the Apostle Paul, who knew well the sting of the lash and the sting of rejection, the record shows that those who have been profoundly used by God “to build the church suffered grinding affliction along the way.”

It may surprise readers to learn that renowned preacher Charles Spurgeon suffered from depression or that Jonathan Edwards was ousted from an influential pulpit and spent the remainder of his ministry in the wilderness. John Newton composed Amazing Grace, but he also weathered financial distress and professional pettiness and politics in the pursuit of his calling. It turns out that many of the names we associate with great faith and “success” in ministry were plagued throughout their lives with criticism from their community (often from their own people!), chronic health concerns, or circumstances that were a continual source of mental anguish and despair.

Grueling, Glorious Calling

Historical heroes of the faith ministered in an era of high mortality rates among children, depressing statistics for women in child-bearing years, and the total absence of antibiotics and effective methods of pain relief. Add to this the challenges of ministry life, particularly in cultures where the gospel was not welcome, and it becomes clear that “the surpassing power belongs to God,” and His servants are merely fragile vessels with a powerful message.

Fast forward a century or two, however, and statistics from The Gospel Coalition point to the sobering fact that “pastor suicides climbed 24 percent between 1999 and 2014.” (32) In spite of heightened awareness of mental illness and treatment options among the general population, pastors continue to be reluctant to share their own struggles with depression or doubt.

Pray for Sanctified Courage

Reading the stories of historical figures who loomed larger than life against a backdrop of persecution, jailing, pressure to compromise, and family drama has encouraged me to pray with greater wisdom for present-day ministry leaders. Family challenges may not include a small-pox epidemic, but parenting in the 21st century is not without peril. Add to this the pervasive consumer culture rampant within the church in which Christians “shop” churches for programs, sermons, decor, and a coffee menu that is tailored to their specific preferences, and it’s easy to see why a pastor could become discouraged.

It’s said that Spurgeon’s preaching career resulted in larger church sanctuaries, built to accommodate the crowds he drew. Most ministry leaders will never experience that degree of exposure, and yet we can pray for them to share the truth with holy boldness among the flock God sends to them.  Pastors who love courageously put their hearts at risk in a way that is Christ-like and winsome and yet costly.

Peter, the fisherman turned ministry leader, warned his own flock:

“Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery trial when it comes upon you to test you, as though something strange were happening to you.”

He spoke from experience, of course, but suffering in the context of ministry is never wasted, and after reading about the endurance of these 12 men in church history, I can sense my own tiny mustard seed of faith sprouting just a bit more.


Many thanks to Baker Books for providing a copy of this book to facilitate my review, which, of course, is offered freely and with honesty.

I  am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. If you should decide to purchase 12 Faithful Men: Portraits of Courageous Endurance in Pastoral Ministry simply click on the title (or the image) within the text, and you’ll be taken directly to Amazon. If you decide to buy, I’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Thankful for those who have run the race with endurance,

Oh, and if you’re looking for some inspiration from the lives of faithful women, Eric Metaxas has compiled seven biographies of seven women who demonstrate virtues such as vision, perseverance, and faith. You can read my review here. Michelle Derusha has put together an incredible resource highlighting 50 historical women, each of whom was a world changer in her own way. Click here to read more. 

If you enjoy reading Living Our Days, subscribe to get regular content delivered to your inbox. Just enter your e-mail address in the field at the top of this page.

I link-up with a number of blogging communities on a regular basis. They are listed in the left sidebar by day of the week. I hope that you will take a moment to enjoy reading the work of some of these fine writers and thinkers.

9 Resources for Parenting Your School-Age Child

I have a complicated relationship with parenting books. As a new mother, I read all the books, analyzed all the angles, second-guessed all the decisions, and the only thing that saved my sanity is that Google had not yet been invented. That tightrope walk persisted for years until I learned to view the books with their diverse offerings of wisdom as a gathering place, a fellowship of parenting. Since there is an endless number of ways to be a good parent, I finally realized that it is helpful to read multiple perspectives … and it is most decidedly not helpful to take every piece of advice as gospel. Even so, with shared wisdom and reassurance from their own parenting successes and failures, it is a gift when authors come alongside other parents with a collection of answers — as well as a fistful of new questions — to stimulate growth in their readers, both personally and parentally.

Join me over at The Redbud Post where I’m sharing nine of the best parenting resources I’ve read and reviewed here at Living Our Days. In the growing and the learning and the letting go of raising children, we long for wisdom that is both biblical and practical. We want reassurance that we are not failing, that we have not already destroyed our children with our misguided choices and haphazard ways. We need insights that acknowledge the uniqueness of each child, each family and each set of circumstances. In the perpetual challenge of raising another generation of believers, we need fuel that will enable us to fight against the prevailing culture and for hope and joy because so often we are swimming upstream. When the sun sets on another day in the life of your growing family, whatever resources you choose to consult along the way, first consider Jesus, for He alone can enable us to make our parenting vision a reality.

Redbud Writers Guild

I hope you’ll be encouraged and inspired by the collection of resources I’ve compiled, and that you will also take some time to visit the other offerings on the site, reminding you that you are not alone in your parenting journey,

michele signature rose[1]

 

If you enjoy reading Living Our Days, subscribe to get regular content delivered to your inbox. Just enter your e-mail address in the field at the top of this page.

I link-up with a number of blogging communities on a regular basis. They are listed in the left sidebar by day of the week. I hope that you will take a moment to enjoy reading the work of some of these fine writers and thinkers.

Your New Life Beyond the To-Do List

As one who lives by a list, I have come to appreciate the satisfaction of a neat column of check marks at the end of a day, the faithful reminder to pray or to do or to go, and the convenience of a resource close at hand:
“Didn’t we buy slippers for her last Christmas?”
“Yes, I think so, but let me check the list . . . “

List making is a utilitarian practice that keeps me (mostly) on the rails. However, in Make a List: How a Simple Practice Can Change Our Lives and Open Our Hearts, Marilyn McEntyre has elevated list writing to a creative endeavor, a writing exercise that is partly spiritual formation, partly imaginative play, and partly a recording of the music of one’s own soul. Putting the pen to paper or the fingers to the keyboard, the list maker asks questions, poses possibilities, and frames her desires.

In Word by Word, McEntyre chose fifteen words and challenged readers to discover them anew as “little fountains of grace.” In Make a List, she argues for the life-changing benefits of gathering our words into lists that inspire and challenge.

A List Is a Beginning

When McEntyre began making a list entitled “What Love Looks Like,” she found that the practice opened  her understanding of the monumental definition of love found in I Corinthians 13:

“Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices in the truth.”

She remembered her grandfather reading to her and her husband brewing coffee.
She pictured a volunteer chopping carrots in a soup kitchen.
Making a list is the beginning of a wider understanding of an idea that may have become tired or hackneyed, so obvious that you have stopped “seeing” it.

A Mental Exercise Turned Outward

Throughout the book, there are “Lists to Try,” a concept I appreciate, for perhaps every list would not be meaningful to every list maker, but it’s okay to try–in the same way we might try the New York Times crossword puzzle or try juggling three tennis balls in the living room.

A list can solidify a nagging sense of unrest into a concrete “diagnosis.”

  • What are my concerns in this season?
  • What can I let go of?
  • What am I afraid of?

A list of possibilities is the first step toward meaningful change.

Disturbing the Smooth Surface of the Obvious

For six years I have been maintaining a gratitude list, pondering and then scribbling three gifts each day into a small journal. I’m pleased to note that the practice has changed the way I look at the world, but later this year, after I have recorded my 7,000th gift, I want to let that practice rest for a time so I can “try” some new lists. Maybe I will argue with myself in list form or begin compiling a collection of reasons why my faith matters to me. It may be that I will make a case for continuing some of the things I am already doing while at the same time listing some things I want to try.

When a do-list becomes a collection of intentions and hopes, the world becomes larger and the heart opens wider. In a busy life in which action so often precedes thought, the practice of making a list rearranges what we think we know and invites us into a life beyond the obvious. 

Many thanks to William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company for providing a copy of this book to facilitate my review, which, of course, is offered freely and with honesty.

I  am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. If you should decide to purchase Make a List: How a Simple Practice Can Change Our Lives and Open Our Hearts or Word by Word: A Daily Spiritual Practice, simply click on the title (or the image) within the text, and you’ll be taken directly to Amazon. If you decide to buy, I’ll make a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Trusting for Grace to Live Beyond the To-Do List,

michele signature rose[1]

If you enjoy reading Living Our Days, subscribe to get regular content delivered to your inbox. Just enter your e-mail address in the field at the top of this page.

I link-up with a number of blogging communities on a regular basis. They are listed in the left sidebar by day of the week. I hope that you will take a moment to enjoy reading the work of some of these fine writers and thinkers.