Borrowed Strength for Mothers

Encouragement; reassurance; words of wisdom crafted in the trenches.

Somehow, Seth Haines knew that this was the gift his wife needed for the Christmas following the birth of their third child — so he put out the word.  Friends, favorite authors, and bloggers were asked for a contribution of hope, a letter from the heart of a mother.  The response far exceeded Seth’s expectations, and he was able to present to his wife, Amber C. Haines, a collection of stories:  joyful accounts of tiny people and huge love; tales of grief and estrangement; recollections of disappointment and of celebration.

Now the gift is being multiplied in The Mother Letters, an exquisitely bound and illustrated gift book that fosters community while it celebrates the beauty of borrowed strength.  The truth is that motherhood is (as the subtitle suggests) an amazing and exhausting mix of laughter, joy, struggles, and hope.

Each letter overflows with grace and simple wisdom:

  • slow down
  • have grace with yourself
  • stay faithful to your whole calling
  • listen to what your children are teaching you
  • the days are long, but the years are short
  • simplify everything

Like Amber, I have lived the chaos that accompanies life with four tiny boys, but any woman who wears the name “Mother,” will find in The Mother Letters an invitation to die — and then to discover the strength that lies on the other side of weakness.

//

This book was provided by Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group, in exchange for my review.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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Published by

Michele Morin

I am a teacher, blogger, reader, and gardener who finds joy in sitting at a table surrounded by women with open Bibles. I have been married to an unreasonably patient husband for nearly 27 years, and our four children are growing up at an alarming rate. Nonetheless, two teens still remain at home, and along with an incorrigible St. Bernard, we laugh, make messes, clean them up, and then start all over again. I love hot tea and well-crafted sentences, poems that stop me in my tracks and days at the ocean with the whole family. I lament biblical illiteracy and advocate for the prudent use of "little minutes." I blog at Living Our Days because "the way I live my days will be, after all, the way I live my life." You can connect with me on Facebook or Twitter.

15 thoughts on “Borrowed Strength for Mothers”

  1. This review reminds me that I need to go back and read through the series of letters that my mother wrote to me for several years. My siblings and I found them in her stuff during her last months with Alzheimer’s, in envelopes marked not to be read until I die. She had written them over the course of many years. Invaluable!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Borrowed strength… such a fitting title. I especially love the line: ‘an invitation to die — and then to discover the strength that lies on the other side of weakness’; it reminds me of what great strength is available to us as we accept our weaknesses and embrace God’s incomparable power. Blessings to you, Michele.

    Like

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