The Great Paradox

Rich in metaphor, dizzying in apparent contradiction, Scripture describes the Kingdom of God with upside-down truth:  life out of death, power in humility, healing from brokenness, suffering as the path to glory.  In Stronger, his gripping memoir, Clayton King captures the underlying, big-picture paradox, and while he’s at it, he seizes the opportunity to relieve us of some pervasive wrong thinking about strength.  He also had believed the lie:

“To me, strength and success were proof that God was using me and that He loved me.”

Active in ministry since the age of fourteen, Clayton now travels internationally to speak in prisons, churches, and schools.  Founder and president of a humanitarian non-profit and a teaching pastor, he found that his ministry and his family life began spinning out of control when, in his thirties, he experienced the deaths of nine close family members.  Walking with him through the dark days of loss and his intense grief over the illnesses and deaths of both parents, the reader is invited to enter into the truth of God’s words in Psalm 91:

“I will be with him in trouble.”

Clayton helps his readers to see that God’s presence is “part of the greater purpose in our trials,” because the truth is that our strength comes from God.

There is no index in Stronger (It’s not that kind of book.), but if there were, the word leverage would have — by my extremely unscientific tally — at least eight entries.  The concept figures prominently in Clayton’s thinking, and here’s why:  Life on a fallen planet guarantees dark days and long nights; weakness; hard times; hopeless seasons; suffering; loss; regret; abuse and fear.  Stronger shares how God’s great power will leverage all of these for His own purpose; for our good and for His glory; for our ultimate transformation into disciples; for the sake of our humility, development, and growth; for the sake of helping others.

In this paradox, and in one sentence, Clayton King summarizes the problem of pain:

“We live in a world where the kingdom of God has not yet been fully realized on the earth, and in the meantime there are many things we can and must experience that we cannot make sense of with our intellect.”

Instead of intellectual mastery, God offers understanding, and “weakness is the doorway to understanding.  Understanding is the doorway to compassion and ministry.”

Clayton King’s journey and the telling of it — “How Hard Times Reveal God’s Greatest Power” — offers truth like a crowbar to pry our hearts away from the notion that weakness is a destination, when the truth is this:

“The goal is to be stronger.  Weakness is God’s way of getting you there.”


This book was provided by BakerBooks, a division of Baker Publishing Group, in exchange for my review.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Subscribe to get regular Bible studies and book reviews from Living Our Days delivered to your inbox.  Just enter your e-mail address in the box at the top of this page.

I link up with these communities on a regular basis:  Soli Deo Gloria Connections, Inspire Me Mondays, Good Morning Mondays, Soul Survival, Testimony Tuesday, Titus 2 Tuesday, Tell His Story, Coffee for Your Heart, Live Free Thursdays, Faith-Filled Fridays, Grace and Truth, Fellowship Friday, Still Saturday, The Weekend Brew, Sunday Stillness, Faith and Fellowship, Blessing Counters, Women with Intention, Sharing His Beauty, Monday Musings, Motivate and Rejuvenate Monday, Thought Provoking Thursday, Small Wonder, A Little R & R, Beloved Brews, SusanBMead, Faith Along the Way, Cozy Reading Spot, Reflect

Advertisements

Published by

Michele Morin

I am a teacher, blogger, reader, and gardener who finds joy in sitting at a table surrounded by women with open Bibles. I have been married to an unreasonably patient husband for nearly 27 years, and our four children are growing up at an alarming rate. Nonetheless, two teens still remain at home, and along with an incorrigible St. Bernard, we laugh, make messes, clean them up, and then start all over again. I love hot tea and well-crafted sentences, poems that stop me in my tracks and days at the ocean with the whole family. I lament biblical illiteracy and advocate for the prudent use of "little minutes." I blog at Living Our Days because "the way I live my days will be, after all, the way I live my life." You can connect with me on Facebook or Twitter.

8 thoughts on “The Great Paradox”

  1. Leverage. That’s not a topic we hear much about! Sounds like Stronger is an amazing book. I’ll have to keep it in the forefront of my mind if I run across a copy of it. Thanks for sharing about it, Michele.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. “The goal is to be stronger. Weakness is God’s way of getting you there.” I love this, Michele! I have experienced in my own life when God’s strength shined through in my weakest moments. And even though I still felt physically weak, at the same time I felt spiritually strong where His presence felt evident. Sounds like a great read, Michele, that keeps you thinking of the awesomeness of our God. : )

    Like

  3. What profound thoughts and good questions, my husband will be very interested in this because he has lived in the middle east. Sharing on facebook. Stopping over because you commented on my blog, Living a Slower God Life. Blessings

    Like

  4. Very interesting. I’ve had conversations with many Christians who struggle with the points he brings up… the world tells us we can learn and be smart enough to understand everything, but in reality there is much we will never understand this side of eternity.

    Thank you for sharing with The Cozy Reading Spot

    Marissa

    Liked by 1 person

  5. This sounds like an excellent read. Thank you so much for sharing it with us, Michele. The Christian life is one of paradoxes, isn’t it?

    Love this line: ““The goal is to be stronger. Weakness is God’s way of getting you there.”

    May He continue to fill our cups until His strength overflows from them! Blessings.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s