One Weekend in History

For years I celebrated Easter as if it were a stand-alone holiday, singing “Up from the Grave He Arose” without giving much thought to the horror of the Dying or the silence of the Dead. Providentially, my early efforts to incarnate and to enliven an invisible God in the hearts of four sweet boys found a way into the obtuse heart of their mother as well.  Therefore, this Lenten season, I will be re-reading A Glorious Dark, a book about believing which confronts the loss and defeat of Friday and the awkward silence of Saturday with Sunday morning resurrection truth.  Where memoir meets theological pondering, author A.J. Swoboda’s story winds through his faith journey, with the bonus of startling spotlight quotes which he aims at himself and at all of us who say that we believe.  Here’s one of the dozen or more:

“Many envision faith as a kind of hall pass for laziness, excusing them from a life of action, doing, and working hard.”

Ouch and amen.

What we believe about one weekend in history, the three days’ journey from Golgotha to the garden tomb, impacts our whole experience of the Christian life.  A Glorious Dark challenges the reader to enter into Friday, to “own up to our part of the evil in the world.”  This involves trusting for the lavish grace to have our emptiness filled, our requests denied, and our fatherlessness remedied by the Father.  On Friday, we turn our faces away from our “sponge” of choice and embrace our identity as pilgrims, lifelong seekers of the will and the voice of God.

With candor, Swoboda describes the bleak-hearted rising of post-crucifixion Saturday, and because much of the Christian life is lived under Saturday-like conditions, it is helpful to hear that we must “sit in Saturday;” we must “squat in the tomb” in order to enter into the grief and disappointment of the original disciples.  Saturday is our opportunity to remember our own mortality, to remember that we live with Jesus in his death.  On Saturday, we evict ourselves from the center of the universe by “embracing the gift of waiting,” and by mourning our failure to see others and their grief.

Resurrection Sunday not only verifies all that Jesus claimed, but it points to his future coming, the ultimate surprise which will serve to further verify all that we hold true.  As the church meets to celebrate the resurrection every Sunday, we also reenact the resurrection, celebrating the mystery  with “people we normally wouldn’t love, [who] breathe down our necks, [but who] hold our feet to the fire of our beliefs.”  Sunday faith perseveres when my theology cannot account for the chaos I see around me.

A Glorious Dark reveals a God who “stand[s] tall” above human history and invites (rather than scorns) the questioning heart.  After all, of the thirty-one questions Jesus posed in the Gospels, He answered only three.  When God does not break into history to rectify the list of problems set forth in my latest memorandum/prayer, it will be helpful to remember the messy way in which that one weekend in history played out for those who were on the scene.  Once again, the life of Jesus will be made manifest, a glorious life emerging from a glorious dark.

//

This book was provided by Baker Books in exchange for my review.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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Michele Morin

Michele Morin is a teacher, blogger, reader, and gardener who finds joy in sitting at a table surrounded by women with open Bibles. She has been married to an unreasonably patient husband for over 25 years, and their four children are growing up at an alarming rate. Michele loves hot tea and well-crafted sentences, poems that stop her in her tracks and days at the ocean with the whole family. She laments biblical illiteracy and advocates for the prudent use of “little minutes.” She blogs at Living Our Days, and you can connect with her on Facebook or Twitter.

4 thoughts on “One Weekend in History”

  1. Thank you for this timely post! I found you on Titus 2 Tuesdays. I am also a grandmother and I have just started blogging. I am subscribing to your blog so I can read more of your reviews. I love to read!

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    1. Isn’t grandmother-ing just the best? If we were having tea together, we could compare pictures on our phones. Hope you find encouragement and some good books to read on Living Our Days! Thanks for introducing yourself.

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  2. Hi Michele – I am including this book review in the March issue of RUBY magazine, and will be sending you the links and codes for sharing RUBY here on your blog . . . . just as soon as I get this issue of the magazine published. Thanks so much for sharing your book review with the readers of RUBY magazine! Nina @ RUBY

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