A Study in Perseverance

Determination perseveres in spite of the word “no.”

When Rosalie Ranquist realized that she was called to be a missionary, her rough background and lack of education led church leaders to discourage her from pursuing her goal.  Even so, in 1967 she left for Papua New Guinea and her career was remarkable in every way — particularly in light of her seemingly inadequate preparation.  Although she is, technically, “retired” now, she continues her involvement as an international literacy consultant on a limited basis, and she still shares her favorite Scripture verse with others:

“Therefore, my beloved brethren, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that your labor is not in vain in the Lord,”

I Corinthians 15:58

Knowing that Rosalie is facing some health challenges, she and her verse have been on my mind lately, and since I’ve been reading in I Corinthians 15 for the past three weeks, this was the perfect time for me to visit Biblegateway.com for resources that deepen my insight into Rosalie’s verse.

capture

Since there are thirteen Study Bibles to choose from, I was able to review the verse’s historical context, and also found this insight from John MacArthur:

“The hope of resurrection makes all the efforts and sacrifices in the Lord’s work worth it.  No work done in His name is wasted in light of eternal glory and reward.”

Steadfast, immovable, and abounding are not words that most of us use in everyday speaking, so I was surprised to note how many of the newer translations have stuck with them.  You can check for yourself by clicking on the  I Corinthians 15:58 in all English translations link below the verse.

The NRSV and Amplified Bibles used the word excelling, and the New Living chose outstanding to speak of “abounding in the work of the Lord.”

The Good News Translation used firm and steady for steadfast and immovable, while the International Children’s Bible spoke of being steady and strong.

The Living Bible put some meat on the bones of Paul’s opening “therefore”:

“So, my dear brothers, since future victory is sure, be strong and steady, always abounding in the Lord’s work, for you know that nothing you do for the Lord is ever wasted as it would be if there were no resurrection.”

This rendering of the verse anchors it deeply in the big picture of the chapter’s theme:  Resurrection.  A click on the four brown parallel lines beside the reference allowed me to view the entire chapter as needed, for I Corinthians 15 provides the most thorough teaching of any chapter in the Bible on resurrection and the Christian life.

Paul is not offering an empty or theoretical hope.  His admonition toward a steadfast and immovable perseverance on the narrow path —  even when it feels as if the narrow path may be squeezing the life out of you —  is not just a happy thought to keep us company as we endure.  It is a promise of future life that has been verified by the resurrection of God the Son.  Jesus was the “first fruits” of that promise, and based on that, we know that God can deliver the goods.

Resurrection is the bass note that thrums underneath every word that Paul has written in this long and theologically rich chapter, for the truth of resurrection is the basis of a living, breathing, get-up-in-the-morning-and-obey-God-all-day kind of faith.   It is only because God keeps showing up with power that I can war against sin — every day.  He offers freedom from slavery to other people’s approval and from my stubborn need to be “right.”  He brings life to this new creation so that I can find grace to hate the selfishness and small-living that would keep me at the center of my own universe.

Rosalie Ranquist and the truth of her favorite verse serve as a continual reminder to me that nothing is wasted in God’s economy:  our suffering and our service are all infused with meaning because we live in a hope that is based on Truth.

//

Check out the resources at Biblegateway.com by using it to enhance your understanding of a passage that you are studying today!

 

//

If you enjoy reading Living Our Days, subscribe to get regular Bible studies and book reviews from delivered to your inbox.  Just enter your e-mail address in the box at the top of this page.

I link-up with a number of blogging  communities on a regular basis.  They are listed in the left sidebar by day of the week.  I hope that you will take a moment to enjoy reading the work of some of these fine writers and thinkers.

Wicked Splendid

For the reader who writes (or for the writer who reads), certain authors are a gold mine.  With a bracing vocabulary, a precision of thought, and a way with a sentence that manages to be both wise and witty, David Bentley Hart has a perspective on the world that requires a careful reading  — that is well-rewarded.

In A Splendid Wickedness, a collection of fifty-two occasional essays, I recorded a list of twenty-four completely unfamiliar words, not including all those that I recognized but have only admired from afar.  Although I prefer a traditional book to my Kindle for most reading, e-readers might have been invented for this caliber of writing because of their ready access to a dictionary.   Since I had to look up my new words the old-fashioned way, I will treat you to my five favorites:

  • autochthonous — indigenous; formed in the place where it is found
  • bedizen — to dress or adorn gaudily
  • sidereal — of our relating to stars or constellations
  • orgulous — proud
  • eidetic — marked by extraordinarily accurate and vivid recall

(You’re welcome.)

The journey through A Splendid Wickedness covers terrain as diverse as the virtues of idleness, capital punishment, baseball, book reviews, and a series of philosophical ponderings delivered in a warm and furry tone by Hart’s dog, Roland.

The title track (Essay #23) examines literary characters Don Juan and Don Quixote, and wonders aloud why the figure of Quixote has been “borne aloft by his beautiful and mysterious timelessness,” while Juan has become passé.  Swerving from literary to cultural criticism, Hart concludes that because we have, in our time, lost our appreciation for a transcendent good, and because “our culture is not subject to the torments of immutable moral laws,” there can be “no such thing as splendid wickedness, simply because, if we do not see ourselves in the light of the Good beyond being, nothing in our nature can be cast in sufficiently striking relief.”

It is this sort of cogent thinking that shows up in Hart’s thoughts on various topics:

“The wonderful thing about holiness, when you really encounter it, is that it testifies to itself.”

“All that is needed to make even the most outlandish theory seem plausible to the truly doctrinaire materialist is that it come wrapped in the appurtenances of empirical science.”

” . . . the worst fate that could befall America, one far grimmer than the mere loss of some of its fiscal or political supremacy in the world, would be the final triumph of a true cultural secularism.”

Having read straight through all fifty-two essays, my impulse now is to put the book on my nightstand (with Amy Carmichael, Luci Shaw, Madeleine L’Engle, and Elisabeth Elliot) for a slower read — a take-one-weekly-for-a-year-prescription for an infusion of fine writing and sharp thinking.

In my favorite essays, the author shinnies out onto some of the shakier limbs of his family tree, finding there a practicing pagan (complete with sacrifices to Janus on a marble altar); a bronzed, severed left thumb (a relic from a chance amputation in a formal duel); and a metaphysical materialist who was obsessed with death.  As for me, my ancestral roots run all gnarly into Northern Maine and the Canadian Maritimes, a people who expressed themselves in ways both understated and forceful.  After an aspirated pause, I’m sure they would have pronounced Hart’s book to be “wicked splendid.”

And they would have been correct.

//

This book was provided by William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company in exchange for my review.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

If you enjoy reading Living Our Days, subscribe to get regular Bible studies and book reviews from delivered to your inbox.  Just enter your e-mail address in the box at the top of this page.

I link-up with a number of blogging  communities on a regular basis.  They are listed in the left sidebar by day of the week.  I hope that you will take a moment to enjoy reading the work of some of these fine writers and thinkers.

Wreathed in Contentment

A toddler-sized pair of skates wired to an evergreen spray and adorned with a bow — that’s the best I can do!  But not everyone is craft-challenged like I am, and Sarah O. Maddox has made a practice of hanging a beautiful wreath on the door of her home no matter what the season as a symbol of contentment, a sign that her heart has said yes to the gift of that particular house in that particular location — a sign that her heart has said yes to God.

In You Can Learn to be Content, a book that incorporates both memoir and devotional inspiration, Sarah describes her discovery that she had an uneasy relationship with contentment, and then shares her journey toward living in the light that Isaiah speaks of:

Who among you fears the Lord
    and obeys the voice of his servant?
Let him who walks in darkness
    and has no light
trust in the name of the Lord
    and rely on his God.  (Isaiah 50:10)

Hebrews 10:35-38 reminds believers that the root of discontent is a mindset of doubt and fear, admonishing us not to “cast away our confidence” in Him.

While there’s nothing wrong with having an eye for improvement, Sarah shares three common obstacles to contentment that steal our joy:

  1.  Unmet expectations lead to disappointment, frustration, and regret, and “when the circle of regret becomes [our] resting place, contentment flees out the door.”
  2. My response to others gives them power over me.  Poet Fran McDaniel shares this wisdom:  “Choose not to be offended; rather, seek to understand.”
  3. The truth is that “what’s down in the well may come up in the bucket!”  When under pressure and plagued with uncertainty, walking in the way of contentment has to be a conscious choice that comes from within.

From Jehoshaphat’s prayer in the midst of what looked to be a losing battle, Sarah encourages her readers that even when we feel powerless in the battle for contentment, the answer is to look to God for guidance.  Peppered with examples of her own struggles through perplexing circumstances, she shares homely wisdom from her museum of memories:

  • “Because God wants you to trust Him, He will see to it that you have to.”
  • “God:  Vacate and let me occupy.”
  • “A contented woman is not dependent on anyone else for her satisfaction.  She has not made her house, her financial situation, her husband, her children, or her friends slaves of her expectations.”

Psalm 62:5 gives words for the heart of the woman who desires contentment in her bones:

“My soul,
Wait silently for God alone,
For my expectation is from Him . . .”

With this wisdom, even in the midst of changing circumstances, the woman who believingly follows Jesus Christ can live with a heart that is wreathed in contentment.

//

This book was provided by the author in exchange for my review.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

If you enjoy reading Living Our Days, subscribe to get regular Bible studies and book reviews from delivered to your inbox.  Just enter your e-mail address in the box at the top of this page.

I link-up with a number of blogging  communities on a regular basis.  They are listed in the left sidebar by day of the week.  I hope that you will take a moment to enjoy reading the work of some of these fine writers and thinkers.

Always a Surprise

Remember the last time you were in a conversation with someone who really seemed to be listening?  They asked all the right questions, and they seemed, honestly and truly, to want to hear your story.  They nodded and looked you right in the eye, smiled with encouragement, laughed in all the right places.

And it’s always a surprise when that happens, isn’t it?

That’s how I felt when Cheryl Smith asked me to participate in an interview for her blog.  I’ve enjoyed her writing — especially her interviews — for quite some time, because she has a knack for framing the conversation in a way that feels like a visit.

I couldn’t believe how long it took me to think through her list of questions and to write my answers.  To be honest, it felt a little awkward at first, as if I was monopolizing the conversation or over-sharing.

Besides, I like to be the one who asks the questions.

I wondered, “Who’s going to be interested in my answers?”  My heart pounded a rhythm of “keep-this-short” and the old familiar not-enough-messages kept playing in the background, but eventually, I realized that Cheryl’s interview questions fit right in with the mission of Living Our Days and with everything I write or teach.  So, I hope that you will hop on over to Cheryl’s place, Homespun Devotions, and read our conversation about my family, my faith, the grace I am receiving, and the lessons from God’s Word that I am trusting.

//

If you enjoy reading Living Our Days, subscribe to get regular Bible studies and book reviews from delivered to your inbox.  Just enter your e-mail address in the box at the top of this page.

I link-up with a number of blogging  communities on a regular basis.  They are listed in the left sidebar by day of the week.  I hope that you will take a moment to enjoy reading the work of some of these fine writers and thinkers.

 

The Heavens Declare!

Capture2Little people find words first for the people and the things that are most important to them.  As one of the “named people” in my grandson’s life, I love to read books to him that include pictures of the sun, moon, and stars, because he responds by pointing to them, naming them over and over, and then returning to that page again and again as if the drawing is truly lighting up his life.

How exciting for him that Mary Manz Simon and Lizzie Walkley have collaborated on a pair of books that celebrate two basic — and yet profound — theological truths:  God Made the Sun and God Made the Moon.  Sturdy cardboard and rounded corners mean that the books were designed for little hands.  Vivid primary colors and a diverse mix of friends trumpet the fun and beauty of each day that God has made, while soothing pastels, soft jammies, and a comfy bedtime routine remind little sleepy-heads that the moon is God’s hand-made night light.

Daytime and nighttime are both gifts from God, and while tiny fingers trace the cut- away circles and crescents in each book, eager ears and hearts can be absorbing truth from the rhymed text as loving parents (and grandparents!) read about about these foundational concepts:

  1.  Every day is an adventure!
  2. Every night is a time to be thankful.
  3. Routines and schedules — lunch time, bath time, story time, prayer time — are sweet boundaries that bring structure and security to a child’s life.
  4. God’s love is even more reliable than the sun and the moon.
  5. The God who made the sun and the moon is well able to keep and care for His children.

What a great opportunity to introduce the truth of Psalm 19:1,2 — and a manageable memorization project for little sponges!

The heavens declare the glory of God;
    the skies proclaim the work of His hands.
Day after day they pour forth speech;
    night after night they reveal knowledge.

Let’s accept this invitation to join the sun, the moon, and all of God’s creation in fulfilling the purposes for which we were made!

//

This book was provided by Worthy Publishing in exchange for my review.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

If you enjoy reading Living Our Days, subscribe to get regular Bible studies and book reviews from delivered to your inbox.  Just enter your e-mail address in the box at the top of this page.

I link-up with a number of blogging  communities on a regular basis.  They are listed in the left sidebar by day of the week.  I hope that you will take a moment to enjoy reading the work of some of these fine writers and thinkers.

 

A Different Kind of Woman

A favorite Elisabeth Elliot quote comes to mind whenever I overhear fragments of the ongoing row about the role of women in the church:

“I am not a different kind of Christian because I am a woman, but I am, most certainly, a different kind of woman because I am a Christian.”

Since ten of the twenty-seven believers commended by Paul for faithfulness in the early church at Rome were women, it is no surprise that women continued to fulfill roles of influence and responsibility throughout church history, whether recognized and appreciated — or overlooked and unsung.  The individuals featured in Michael Haykin’s Eight Women of Faith span nearly three hundred of those years (1537-1817),  and each of his subjects faced and overcame significant cultural obstacles.  In his eight vignettes, Michael chronicles the way in which significant cultural changes in the 18th century impacted women of faith.  Some were able to leave their own record of faith in their own words, while others are known to us only because they have been lauded in the writings of others.

The Queen – “Faith Only Justifieth”  

The great niece of Henry VIII, Lady Jane Grey (1537-1554) was Queen of England for a little over a week, and she also did time in the Tower of London like so many of her royal relatives of that era.  Condemned to death for her Protestantism by her devoutly Catholic cousin, Mary I (with the less-flattering name, “Bloody Mary”), Jane stood firm in her belief that faith alone justifies, and this along with her view of the Lord’s Supper show that she had clearly embraced the doctrines of the Reformation.  A Woman of the Word to the end, she owned a Greek New Testament and recited Psalm 51 from memory before being executed.

The Wife – “Ruled by Her Prudent Love in Many Things”

Surprisingly, many of the church fathers held a very low and utilitarian view of marriage.  The Reformers and the Puritans did their bit to put an end to that by their example and by their words, and we find in the writings of Richard Baxter a glowing report of the blessings of marriage.  His wife, Margaret Charlton Baxter (1636-1681), was clearly the one to whom he opened his mind and communicated his concerns.  Although they were childless, they were comrades in ministry during a turbulent period of English history under Charles I in which, for a time, Richard was banned from preaching or leading worship because of his Puritan views. In a faith formed by persecution, Margaret’s influence was formative for her husband and marked a turning point in the recognition that “a husband and wife must take delight in the love, and company, and converse of each other.”

The Theologian – “The Glory of God, and the Good of Souls”

Disregard for female authors persisted well into the eighteenth century. Therefore, Anne Dutton (1692-1765) would naturally have felt that it was necessary to defend herself whenever she shared her gift in the form of books, tracts, treatises, and poems.  In spite of her critics, she was the most prolific female Baptist author of her time, reminding her readers that she wrote only for the glory of God.  At the same time, she boldly critiqued the theology of John Wesley (among others) in their view that it was possible to live without sin on this planet.  Like Lady Jane Grey, Anne also pondered the nature of the elements in communion, beautifully expositing Calvin’s view by describing the Supper as  “communication.”  The Lord “gives Himself . . .  with all the benefits of his death, to the worthy receivers,” and so He is indeed present at the celebration of His Supper.  Anne wrote and taught about her Lord until her death.

The Friend of Revival – “A Wonderful Sweetness”

A key figure in the First Great Awakening of the 18th century in the United States, Jonathan Edwards addressed the topic of revival from various angles.  In an era that minimized the input of women, he, nonetheless, shared (anonymously) the account of his wife, Sarah Edwards’s (1710-1758), spiritual experience so that, although she was not a writer, we have rich insight into her life both from her husband and in the writings of Samuel Hopkins (who was tutored by Jonathan Edwards and lived in their home).  Living with eleven children in the fishbowl of ministry during seasons of financial stress and her husband’s professional ups and downs, Sarah experienced an encounter with God that Jonathan recorded as “the soul . . . being swallowed up with light and love,” accompanied by “an extraordinary sense of the awful majesty and greatness of God” in which she lost all bodily strength.  As a faithful wife and mother, Sarah had the additional honor of becoming a model of what a “true revival personality looks like.”

The Hymnist – “The Tuneful Tongue that Sang Her Great Redeemer’s Praise”

Described as “the Baptist equivalent of Isaac Watts,” Anne Steele (1717-1778) began writing hymns simply to express her personal devotion to God.  As the daughter of a pastor, her creations soon found their way into worship services, and eventually were included in a hymnal.   “Father of Mercies, in Thy Word” is still in use today, and beautifully expresses the rich theology and high view of Scripture that sustained her through a life of continual suffering from various illnesses.

 Father of mercies, in Thy word
What endless glory shines!
For ever be thy name adored
For these celestial lines.

The Daughter – “One of the Best Helps to Keep Up Religion in the Soul”

Recently, reading in the book of I Chronicles, I found a treasure in the midst of the lists.  Hushai the Arkite was immortalized in the pages of Scripture because he was “the king’s friend,” (I Chron. 27:33 NIV).  We don’t value friendship in that way today, but the Bible provides glorious examples of deep friendship, and church history is also a rich source of illustrations.  Esther Edward Burr (1732-1758), daughter of Jonathan and Sarah Edwards, grew up during the Great Awakening and married a minister with the same “evangelical cast of mind” as her father.  Homesick for New England, she began a correspondence with Sarah Prince which chronicles their deep devotion to one another, but, more importantly, serves as a record of a spiritual conversation from which we can learn much about Esther’s commitment to God.  Thanks be to God that Jonathan Edwards saw the importance of educating his daughters!

The Missionary – “Truth Compelled Us”

Adoniram and Ann Judson (1789-1826), pioneer missionaries to Burma, were a key source of inspiration for the modern missionary movement.  In addition to their stalwart service in a field that yielded much trouble and little fruit, the record of their commitment to expressing the truth of Scripture is inspiring.  Ann’s letters document the struggle to learn Burmese, and her testimony of faithfulness ends with her final words on this earth begin spoken in Burmese.

The Novelist – “The Value of that Holy Religion”

With her books being made into movies, Jane Austen (1775-1817) has become a well-known literary figure, but few have documented the deep Christian convictions that lay behind her creative work.  With a father, two brothers, and various other relatives employed as ministers, she was uniquely qualified to write with humor about the ridiculous Rev. Collins and to put words of wisdom about pastoral ministry into the mouth of Edmund of Mansfield Park who asserts that a minister:

“has the charge of all that is of the first importance to mankind . . .”

Jane did not consider herself an evangelical and was uncomfortable with overt displays of religion that characterized the ministry of Hannah More.  Her private but sincere faith was expressed in written prayers and in the Christian virtues that were lauded by the characters in her novels.

No matter what role women choose today — with all our glorious freedom of choice and our comfortable lifestyle to make it so — there is inspiration in Eight Women of Faith.  In her foreword, Karen Swallow Prior describes Haykin’s eight portraits as a demonstration of “how their faith informed, shaped, and fulfilled their earthly callings.”

Women of Faith, may it be so of us today!

//

This book was provided by Crossway in exchange for my review.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

For my recommendations of more biographies of Christian women, check out these reviews:

Seven Women and the Secret of their Greatness by Eric Metaxas

Fifty Women Every Christian Should Know by Michelle DeRusha

Fierce Convictions – The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More by Karen Swallow Prior

If you enjoy reading Living Our Days, subscribe to get regular Bible studies and book reviews from delivered to your inbox.  Just enter your e-mail address in the box at the top of this page.

I link-up with a number of blogging  communities on a regular basis.  They are listed in the left sidebar by day of the week.  I hope that you will take a moment to enjoy reading the work of some of these fine writers and thinkers.

Pain, Emotion, and God

Elisabeth Elliot coined the most memorable definition of human suffering that I have ever heard:  “Suffering is wanting what you don’t have — or having what you don’t want.”  These words came to mind often as I read Between Pain and Grace, because Gerald W. Peterman and Andrew J. Schmutzer have initiated a fresh conversation which does not claim to be the last word on suffering, but is characterized by the scope, depth, and fidelity one would expect from two of Moody Bible Institute’s theology professors.

My attention was arrested immediately by the authors’ careful distinction between pain and suffering.  Consider this:

Pain  — “primarily objective, external, and typically social or physical as opposed to personal and mental.”
Suffering — “primarily subjective, internal, and typically mental or emotional.”

This distinction is important because not all pain is received as suffering — just ask an Olympic gymnast or a brand-new mum.  Conversely, those with leprosy or diabetic neuropathy would welcome pain as a means to alleviate the suffering that occurs when they injure their insensitive extremities.  Dr. Eric Cassell chimes in with the succinct conclusion that “the only way to learn whether suffering is present is to ask the sufferer.”

A biblical theology of suffering must include the truth that Scripture provides a voice for those who suffer; it acknowledges the reality of innocent suffering; and, without moralizing, it affirms the presence of God in the midst of pain.   I never tire of hearing the truth that God is fluent in the language of lament.  He has graciously appointed “script writers” in the psalms and prophets, and throughout Scripture, honest expressions of grief are portrayed as a “natural exhale of worship.”

Because a lively faith is open to the uncomfortable questions and painful stories of those who suffer, the church gathered must be clear in its identity as a safe place for the expression of grief and disappointment. Counselors, individuals dealing with dysfunctional families, and  those who have experienced sexual abuse or who are dealing in some way with mental illness will appreciate the authors’ frank discussion of these topics as they relate to what the Scripture says about pain and suffering.

The term “relational ecosystem” runs as a theme throughout Between Pain and Grace, affirming the fact that there is no such thing as a private or contained sin.  The relational ecosystem of God’s creation has been shaken to its roots by sin, and this is seen at every level:
God with mankind;
man with woman;
humanity with animals;
and humanity with the ground.
Brokenness abounds and the outcome is alienation.  Anger sends out generational shock waves that are amply illustrated in Old Testament family dysfunction.  Peterman and Schmutzer refer to David’s family life as a “relational debris field,” acknowledging that we all are part of “interlocking relationships” that surround us “like the rings of a tree.”

Our relational ecosystem, tangled as it is in personal weakness and sin (another fascinating distinction that the authors delineate), demonstrates the efficacy of the redemption that comes to us in the midst of our brokenness.  Because God Himself chose a path of vulnerability for His Son, the record of Scripture is that God experiences pain and “a theology of a suffering God is evident throughout the testimony of Scripture.”  God’s transcendence is balanced by His immanence, as evidenced in His compassionate love, His relatedness with His creation, and His willingness to risk relationally.

Looking at The Lord’s Prayer through the lens of pain gives it a fresh application, for in Matthew 6, Jesus provides a model for prayer in a suffering world, a challenge to transcend our worries and pain by focusing first on “God’s honor, God’s good, and God’s moral requirements.”

Opening one’s life to spiritual leadership roles also opens the door to some unique forms of suffering — rejection, hopelessness, and discontentment.  We follow a Savior who entered into suffering voluntarily.   Peterman and Schmutzer assert that leaders have likewise made that choice, but then offer the encouragement that tears shed are part of the leader’s path to Christ-likeness.

Since suffering is unavoidable on a fallen planet, this question is also unavoidable for the thinking believer:  What needs to happen in the space between pain and grace?  For most people (including the Apostle Paul!), it holds a journey of acceptance, a yielding of expectations, and most important of all, a commitment to receive the gift of suffering from the hand of an all-wise and sovereign God.

//

This book was provided by Moody Publishers in exchange for my review.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Subscribe to get regular Bible studies and book reviews from Living Our Days delivered to your inbox.  Just enter your e-mail address in the box at the top of this page.

I link-up with a number of blogging  communities on a regular basis.  They are listed in the left sidebar by day of the week.  I hope that you will take a moment to enjoy reading the work of some of these fine writers and thinkers.